152 comments
Donna Barstow
Donna Barstow

As I suspected, you're not an artist. It's so typical of online marketers to say about artists in a high-pitched whine, "Wah!!!! Someone will steal my work!!!"Your ridicule and glossing over of copyright is pathetic. Anyone can watermark anything. And there it goes, bye bye off into the internet for everyone. The point is to implement and understand copyright, and RESPECT the creators! Do you really want to be that guy that weakens copyright?Of course, Pinterest steals and devalues your work, ESPECIALLY if you aren't selling a product, like t-shirts.. The point is how to handle this, not pretend it isn't happening.My own diabolical plan is to post text on top of my cartoons, and then post on Pinterest. And then implement the no opt-in code. Fingers crossed.

Carmen Whitehead
Carmen Whitehead

Great info, I use pinterest everyday for my business and personal use. It does drive some traffic to my site. It's just one component of a larger plan. Here is my profile... Thanks for all your support! http://www.pinterest.com/vintagecw/

Barbara
Barbara

Here is also my pinterest :) and thank you again for your tips. I'm very glad I found this site as it has a lot of questions on some of my answers that I have been struggling with. http://www.pinterest.com/barbarapavlic/

Adrienn Ecsedi
Adrienn Ecsedi

Thank you for this guide Cory! I have only tried out pinterest a few months back, but I think I will give it another try. I have already made some reference collections before, but I like the idea of showing how I progress with an artwork.I have also updated the descriptions of my artworks on Pinterest, every url I put there turns into a link which is great. I like to add the title of my artwork, my name + my website link, then the medium and the year of made, and finally I write something about the artwork itself.My Pinterest page: http://www.pinterest.com/adriennecsedi/

Elizabeth
Elizabeth

Thanks for these tips on Pinterest! Since I started pinning some of my own work, I've noticed that random people started pinning some of the pieces to their boards. It's really important to have good descriptions so that other people can find your work through Pinterest's search.http://www.pinterest.com/ebnartstudio/

Karrie Bond
Karrie Bond

Hi there!Nice article, however I would invite you to update one piece of content on it. The line that says re-pinned images don't link back to the original source is abundantly incorrect. That is what makes Pinterest so appealing for marketers, the fact that no matter how many times an image is shared, it will always link back to the original source. Pinterest was cited in one study (the name of which escapes me) as now generating more traffic for the thousands of sites included in the research, over Bing, Yahoo, Ask and AOL (naturally the top traffic generator is still Google, but the point is that the link-back system that Pinterest uses is significant to driving visits to a pinner's site).Thanks for taking a look at this!

candra
candra

I would love to have you show case some of my art work. I don't know how to market my work.

Wayne Fair
Wayne Fair

Just getting started - but here it is :)http://pinterest.com/aftermonet/pins/Just discovered your blog - absolutely love it! I just got "let go" from my programming job two days ago - but am excited because NOW I can focus on my art! Thanks and kindest regards, Wayne

Katherina
Katherina

Awesome Web-site, Preserve the good work. Thank you!

Kim Minichiello
Kim Minichiello

Great article, clearly written and very informative! www.pinterest.com/kimminichiello

Jamie Wilson
Jamie Wilson

Great stuff! I actually get a TON of business from Pinterest. And honestly, it's mostly not even from my own pins or followers, but from people pinning the pictures from my website & then they end up getting circulated on their own. So I really feel like one of the most important things to add is to make SURE to include Pin It buttons (and set the description part too) on each & every picture on your site. There are tons of blog plugins to do this now, if you use a blog as your site. It's been amazing for me! Here's my pinterest: http://pinterest.com/jellybeanquilts/

ArtMorehead
ArtMorehead

@Donna Barstow I have to agree with your synopsis of this post and can only ask how could a non artist possibly know what an artists needs are when it come to marketing when they know nothing of the arts in general? No offense to, Cory of course I know he means well and I do like his blog but I think this would be a subject that should be proven by some kind of history or background before writing about it.  As being an artist my whole life there are many things here I have to disagree with about posting fine art on Pinterest. Most galleries and/or art reps.have pretty much the same policy as to when it comes to having the exclusive to an artist work. They simply don't want everyone else selling what they are which keeps the pricing where it should be for a fine art piece. Personally I don't list in galleries but then that's my preference as I do fine on my own and will be opening my own gallery soon. However if you have images of your work plastered all over the internet, it actually devalues the work and makes it no longer special to the buyer and/or collector unless of course you plan on mass producing your work like Thomas Kincaid and Walt Disney Productions did with his work. In fact most of Kincaid's Disney work was not even painted by him personally, but that's a whole different issue. Personally the only value I see of an artist using Pinterest is to selling an artists at the lower end of what I call "coffee cup" "calender art". I absolutely would not even show my fine art online even in my own websites gallery. It is only the serious who will come for a private viewing no matter where they are from and will call if you brand yourself on and off line correctly. My work that I show online now is my decorative art and mural painting. Although it is flattering as it is, I have had 18 occurrences of people copying my decorative art work alone and claiming it as their own that I have had to deal with in the past. And quite frankly I simply don't have the time to keep up with a couple of hundred pictures posted on Pinterest. So in closing I would have to say it works both ways as to being good and bad it just really depends on what what your goals are and how you use it. Just because I don't use it to market my fine art doesn't mean I don't use it to branding myself as an artist......After all, there is more than one way to paint a cat .....Peace!

Cory Huff
Cory Huff

Hi Donna - I can certainly understand your desire to protect your intellectual property. You did create it, and you it would be great to be compensated for it.You may want to consider alternate points of view.There are artists who consider copyright anathema to what it means to be an artist. Copyright can actually stifle artistic and scientific innovation. See this episode of our podcast where we talk with Gwenn Seemel about it. http://creativeinsurgents.com/3/

ashar
ashar

oops shld be off

Cory Huff
Cory Huff

Congrats! Being let go was the best thing that ever happened to my career up to that point. ;)

CoryHuff
CoryHuff moderator

@ArtMorehead My only response is that images by Picasso, Warhol, Dali, and Van Gogh are ubiquitous. That doesn't mean their art is less valuable. The common availability of a particular image only drives up the recognition of the artist. 

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  1. [...] With such a wide user-base, Pinterest can be a great tool for artists looking to sell their pieces. However, everything comes with pros and cons so it’s always a good idea to do your research before you get started! You can read more of this article here. [...]

  2. [...] of the visually oriented social site Pinterest has exploded over the past year, and manyartists are using Pinterest to share their work beyond Facebook and [...]